Posts Tagged ‘Jon Irabagon’

Noah Haidu ‘Infinite Distances’ out 2/10/2017 on Cellar Live + Upcoming Shows

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Pianist NOAH HAIDU Reaches New Expressive Heights with Infinite Distances out 2/10/2017 on Cellar Live

Lyrical, intricate album features Sharel Cassity, Jon Irabagon, Jeremy Pelt with two tight, versatile rhythm sections

Haidu’s third outing includes bold originals and a 6-part suite inspired by a passage from poet Rainer Maria Rilke:

“….between the closest human beings infinite distances continue to exist”

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*Preview album on Soundcloud*

Earning praise from Jazzwise as “unquestionably one of the most confident and impressive of all the new pianists,” Brooklyn-based pianist Noah Haidu returns after his well-received Posi-Tone releases Slipstream (2011) and Momentum (2013) with the expansive and ambitious Infinite Distances. Distances explores a concept inspired by a conversation with saxophonist Branford Marsalis, who quoted the writer and philosopher Rainer Maria Rilke in reference to another musician whom he was very close to, but also quite far from.

With a rich ensemble sound and subtly powerful arrangements, the date features alto saxophonist Sharel Cassity, soprano/tenor saxophonist Jon Irabagon, trumpeter Jeremy Pelt and an august rhythm section with drummer John Davis and bassist Ariel Alejandro de la Portilla (four of 11 tracks feature Peter Brendler on bass and Mark Ferber on drums).

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Exclusive Video Premiere: Dave Douglas Quintet, “Time Travel (Alt. Take)” on BurningAmbulance.com

Monday, October 21st, 2013
DD|50: Special Edition 50th Birthday Recordings Box Set Out Tomorrow
Via Greenleaf Music
“Today we’re premiering an exclusive video: “Time Travel (Alt. Take),” from trumpeter Dave Douglas‘s new DD|50 box. It’s an alternate version of the title track from one of the three albums included in the box, performed by his new quintet featuring saxophonist Jon Irabagon, pianist Matt Mitchell, bassist Linda Oh, and drummer Rudy Royston. They’re featured on two of the three albums, Time Travel and Be Still. On the latter disc, they’re joined by vocalist Aoife O’Donovan. Those two albums were initially released separately; the third disc in the box, Pathways, is entirely new, and showcases a whole other band: Greg Tardy on clarinet and tenor sax, Joshua Roseman on trombone, Uri Caine on piano, and Clarence Penn on drums, with Oh and O’Donovan returning on bass and vocals, respectively.” (more…)

FONT PREVIEW WEEK: Q&A with FONT Co-Founder, Director and Co-Curator Dave Douglas

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

Festival of New Trumpet Music (FONT) Preview Week

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Dave Douglas

Q&A with Dave Douglas,
Co-Founder & Director of FONT 2013;
Curator of St. Peter’s Church Programming

Denver-Based Trumpeter Hugh Ragin Makes Rare NYC Appearance
Sept. 22 Leading Jazz Vespers at St. Peter’s Church
Featuring Trumpeters Lew Soloff, James Zollar, Nate Wooley

Douglas’ Own Sextet Sept. 23, Featuring Jon Irabagon, Josh Roseman,
Matt Mitchell, Linda Oh, Rudy Royston & Special Guest Vocalist Heather Masse,
Celebrating Release of New Sextet CD, Pathways, Part of DD|50 Box

Check Out Exclusive FONT Interview with 2013 FONT Honoree
Marcus Belgrave, Conducted by Trumpeter Greg Glassman

Q: How did you become a trumpet player? Did you play other instruments before the trumpet?

DD: Even though trumpet was one of my earliest instruments after piano and trombone, I always naturally thought of myself as a musician. It didn’t occur to me that I was a trumpet player until it was way too late, which is one of the reasons for this festival. It’s to celebrate the trumpet as a piece of equipment in the hands of musicians of every variety, to counter the idea of the trumpeter as a music jock, a sort of athlete of the high notes and proponent of the showiest, brassiest sounds regardless of what the music calls for. We celebrate the Music first. Then the Trumpet, then the New. This is a Festival for music and musicians involved in some of the most compelling, expressive, protean, challenging, and fun music around.

Q: Were there recordings in the beginning and even years into learning the instrument that drew you into the trumpet’s sound and possibilities?

DD: When I finally realized and accepted that I was a trumpeter I was drawn to unique sounding players like Miles Davis, Thad Jones, Lester Bowie, Woody Shaw, Herb Robertson, and of course all the other giant spirits of jazz. I also listened to great classical players like Gerard Schwarz and Raymond Mase, more recently Alison Balsam and Hakan Hardenberger. But I am really a sucker for Macedonian and Mexican brass bands. When the trumpet itself makes people dance how can you not smile?

Q: People often talk about how the trumpet is the hardest instrument to play. Do you feel this is true? What doesn’t the general public understand about playing the trumpet that you wish people would realize?

DD: They say the trumpet is the hardest instrument to play. I’m not sure I agree — they are probably all equally hard. But the trumpet is exposed and personal, like the human voice. You have to figure out how to get a part of your body to effortlessly vibrate at extremely high velocities. This is why trumpet sounds range from the most vulnerable to the most brazen and powerful.

Q: If you had to identify with one or two gurus, trumpeters or otherwise, who had the greatest impact on your musical journey to date, whom would they be?

DD: Aside from all those trumpeters I’ve loved, John McNeil, Carmine Caruso, and Laurie Frink have had the biggest impact on my life as a musician-trumpeter. No question, without them I would not be where I am today. We would likely not be doing this festival. I met co-founder Roy Campbell when I first came to New York in 1984 and at that time I was studying with Carmine. Roy and I heard each other a lot around that time. In starting this festival we both had the same sense that a booster organization for creative trumpeter/composers was an essential job that needed to be done.

Q: How did you select the people you wanted to showcase in your particular curation? Were these people you felt were deserving of wider recognition? Were they people you felt shared a similar working aesthetic as you or came from someplace completely different?

DD: Every year we try to cast as broad a net as we can. We try to support recent arrivals to the scene. We try to celebrate creative pioneers who have pointed the way. And yet, no matter how broad the net, we are always discovering new players and new sounds. We always leave people out, unintentionally! This is one of the richest periods ever as far as new music goes.

Q: Who is your favorite trumpeter today (as in today, the day you are writing this email) and what recorded song available to the public best exemplifies why this trumpeter is so badass?

DD: I practiced a lot today, so if you ask me who is my favorite trumpeter today I am going to say that I am my favorite trumpeter today. How about that? We are all out here practicing to make music and life better. And we all doing it together one note at a time. I love so many players these days and the Festival of New Trumpet Music is a way of celebrating that.

Q: Talk a bit about the venue you chose to curate in? Why is it special to you? Why do you want people to experience that particular venue? Or was it the most hospitable venue available for what you wanted to do?

DD: For the past few years I have been involved in music and spirituality, through recording hymns and spirituals, and through exploring the essence of making music in the moment. Hugh Ragin is a trumpeter who shares that pursuit. When the concert hall at St. Peter’s Church became available for this festival I knew right away that I wanted to present my suite Pathways there. And I knew I would try to get Hugh Ragin to do something. He surpassed my wildest imagination by creating music for the vespers service itself! I cannot wait to hear it.

Q: Can you all share an anecdote about this year’s honoree Marcus Belgrave and what bearing, if any, he has had on your life as a listener, trumpet player, student, or appreciator of creative music?

DD: As I listen to this year’s honoree Marcus Belgrave what amazes me most is how he pulls notes out from all around the horn, the embouchure, and the room. Watching him play is like watching popcorn pop — you never know where the next movement is going to come from. He has one of the most amazing techniques I have ever seen. We are proud to bring him to New York with his own group to honor him with our Award of Recognition.

Q: What event besides the events you curated are you most looking forward to checking out live?

DD: The Henry Brant Flight Over A Global Map for 52 trumpets!!! and percussion is our pièce de resistance this season. I’ve never been involved in anything like this. So many great trumpeters are coming forward to play. It has been a supreme piece of work to organize and I know it is going to be an amazing thrill that will not be repeated any time soon.

Q: Any other thoughts about this year’s festival?

DD: Festival of New Trumpet Music enters its 11th season stronger than ever. New board members, new players, new venues. As a 501(c)3 public nonprofit we appreciate all the support we have had and encourage interested parties to visit our site and consider donating. Thank you.

 

Dave Douglas & Greenleaf Music Announce The Follow-Up To The Critically Acclaimed 2012 Release, ‘Be Still’, TIME TRAVEL

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Additionally: Dave Douglas Quintet Begins 50-U.S. State Tour 
To Coincide With Douglas’ 50th Birthday Year, And Greenleaf Rolls Out First Single & Video
via 
Dave Douglas iPhone & iPad Apps

Following on the heels of the critically acclaimed Be Still, trumpeter/composer/bandleader/label founder and musical community builder Dave Douglas and his label Greenleaf Music proudly announces an all-instrumental follow-up to the album Stereophile called “one of the best-sounding new recordings [we]’ve heard by anybody in quite a while.” Likewise, The New York Times called the album “gorgeous and contemplative,” while the Los Angeles Times deigned it, “a lush collection of hymnals and elegies reworked into widescreen jazz.” (more…)

Fully Altered Media Client Release Schedule **Summer & Fall 2009**

Sunday, July 26th, 2009

August

Ben Perowsky Quartet – Esopus Opus (Skirl) – August 11
w/ Perowsky (drums), Chris Speed (tenor sax, clarinet), Drew Gress (bass), Ted Reichman (accordion, keyboards)

The Waitiki 7 – Adventures in Paradise (Pass Out Records) – August 18
w/ Zaccai Curtis (piano), Tim Mayer (saxes, flutes), Randy Wong (bass), Lopaka Colón (birdcalls, percussion), Jim Benoit (vibes), Helen Liu (violin), Abe Lagrimas, Jr. (drums, vibes, percussion) + special guest Mike Dease (trombone)

Stefon Harris & Blackout – Urbanus (Concord Jazz) – August 25
w/ Harris (vibraphone, marimba), Marc Cary (keyboards, piano, effects), Ben Willams (bass), Casey Benjamin (alto sax, vocoder), Terreon Gully (drums)

Rez Abbasi – Things to Come (Sunnyside) – August 25
w/ Rudresh Mahanthappa (alto sax), Vijay Iyer (piano), Dan Weiss (drums), Johannes Weidenmuller (bass) + Kiran Ahluwalia (Hindustani vocals), Mike Block (cello)

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